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Light - the start of all vision

Our vision depends on light - or rather the eyes absorption of light.  Without light there is no vision - no matter how many carrots you eat - and unsurprisingly the amount of light we are exposed to has been linked to our state of health. Light therapy exposes people to a certain brightness of light - brighter than an indoor light but not as bright as sunlight - and it is believed this therapy can help ease symptoms of depression, jet lag, sleep disorders and correct peoples circadian rhythms.  Light Therapy is also used to treat migraines and this debilitating condition causes 25 million lost days at work or school (Steiner et al, Cephalalgia, 2003 via Migraine Trust website).  That is an amazing amount of time lost and if you are an employer, you can potentially help ease this situation through ensuring the work place has the correct lighting. With such a lot of importance placed on light to function as we should it is important to look around you and ensure you are bringing as much light into your life and those of your employees as possible.  I am not speaking about metaphorical light (love, laughter etc) but a light source.  Look around you now - what light sources are you using?  A window for sunlight? Table lamp? Desk lamp? Candle? Chandelier? If you feel you do not have enough light to work by or relax in then it is worth making a change "Live in rooms full of light" as the Roman encyclopaedist Cornelius Celsus once said! I think it is always best to incorporate as much natural light as possible and bounce this around using mirrors but for cavernous spaces where natural light is lacking think tactically.  In lofty spaces such as converted barns or high ceiling Victorian properties chandeliers make a huge difference but be careful about the size of chandelier you buy. For example, if you have your eye on a large chandelier, ensure you have a ceiling drop of 3.2 meters. You also want to avoid cramming the room simply full of light fittings - allow each light source to be used to it's full effect and ensure the bulbs do not battle with each other over brightness. Top Tip for ensuring you achieve the correct brightness don't compare the wattage of bulbs  as wattage describes the amount of energy used by the bulb not the brightness.  Instead look on the packaging for an indication of the amount of lumens a bulb produces. In small confined spaces think of jam jar lighting and fairy lights you can twist and manipulate to squeeze into the corners and banish the dark. The type of lighting you chose really depends on what you want to use the light for. According to thomaslighting.com there are three different types of lighting - general lighting which allows a comfortable and safe level of lighting, task lighting and accent lighting and all activities can fall into these categories so why not categorize your home or work place and see if you have room for more light?  Bringing light into your living can only be a positive step and an easy way to create mood, balance atmosphere and increase productivity! Vintage Vibe are happy to help with any lighting questions you may have and with a great range of lighting in their warehouse they could be your one stop solution shop!  

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